RefSix

Players making abusive comments towards opponents

snap_RL

New Member
Just been reading some previous posts about OFFINABUS - which mostly relate to comments aime at the Referee / ARs.

What about if players make abusive comments towards their opponents?

I get that racist language or homophobic language is seen as a RC.

What about language that are describing people's physical characteristics, "fat", "ginger". How would you deal with those if the player who was insulted shouted "did you hear that ref?" - effectively complaining about the incident.
 

JamesL

RefChat Addict
Level 4 Referee
Just been reading some previous posts about OFFINABUS - which mostly relate to comments aime at the Referee / ARs.

What about if players make abusive comments towards their opponents?

I get that racist language or homophobic language is seen as a RC.

What about language that are describing people's physical characteristics, "fat", "ginger". How would you deal with those if the player who was insulted shouted "did you hear that ref?" - effectively complaining about the incident.
Well, IF you hear it, you have to act.
 

socal lurker

RefChat Addict
OFFINABUS applies to things said (or gestures made) to anyone. So for comments directed at an opponent, you need to decide if if was unsporting (caution) or if it rises to the level of OFFINABUS (send off).
 

snap_RL

New Member
OK, so if you hear Player A call Player B a "useless ginger tosser", and it's said with some aggression what would you do?
 

one

RefChat Addict
Level 7 Referee
OK, so if you hear Player A call Player B a "useless ginger tosser", and it's said with some aggression what would you do?
If have read other posts on here you would have noticed the majority agree that context is king.

I would react to that anywhere from
- a smile, said in jest and reverse sarcasm to praise an opponent who just scored a belter and the comment drew a smile from scorer
- to a red card, said in a heated exchange in a tense game and and caused an attack from the opponent (red card each)

Having said that the opponent's reaction is not always the biggest factor or any factor at all. "Did you hear that ref?" Is often an attempt to get the opponent sanctioned. Someone who is truly offend usually reacts towards the offender not the referee.
 

snap_RL

New Member
Having said that the opponent's reaction is not always the biggest factor or any factor at all. "Did you hear that ref?" Is often an attempt to get the opponent sanctioned. Someone who is truly offend usually reacts towards the offender not the referee.

That's really helpful advice - thanks
 
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one

RefChat Addict
Level 7 Referee
There are definitely words directed at an opponent that could come under Adopting an Aggressive Attitude
Actually that is not a lotg requirement for a yellow card. It's the FA. Even so, 'could' is the operative word in your statement. I'd say the attitude (agresstion) that is the criteria for the caution not the words.
 

GraemeS

RefChat Addict
Level 5 Referee
Actually that is not a lotg requirement for a yellow card. It's the FA. Even so, 'could' is the operative word in your statement. I'd say the attitude (agresstion) that is the criteria for the caution not the words.
Well yes, but the post I was replying to suggested that a caution for words directed at an opponent isn't possible. I was disagreeing, so only wanted to raise the possibility that it's plausible within the laws.
 

Degnann

SFA Category 1+6
Level 7 Referee
We don’t have a caution code for AA up here but definitely could fall under the all other offences deemed by the referee to be unsporting
 

newref

Active Member
There are definitely words directed at an opponent that could come under Adopting an Aggressive Attitude
I agree, I think that would classify as a yellow. The law doesn't specify adopting an aggressive attitude is only physical and not verbal. But what kind of words/attitude would be enough for only a yellow and not a red?
 

Tealeaf

Lighting the darkest hour
Staff member
Level 5 Referee
I agree, I think that would classify as a yellow. The law doesn't specify adopting an aggressive attitude is only physical and not verbal. But what kind of words/attitude would be enough for only a yellow and not a red?
“Do that again and I’ll knock you out”. Immediate caution and defuse the situation, verbal AA and avoids a violent conduct red card.

There are countless others but this immediately springs to mind.
 

Kes

I'll Decide ...
Level 5 Referee
“Do that again and I’ll knock you out”. Immediate caution and defuse the situation, verbal AA and avoids a violent conduct red card.

There are countless others but this immediately springs to mind.

Offensive? Certainly. Insulting? Possibly. Abusive? I'd say so.

So how could you ever justify a yellow for that?

The answer I gave to the OP was based on the LOTG. :cool:
 

newref

Active Member
Offensive? Certainly. Insulting? Possibly. Abusive? I'd say so.

So how could you ever justify a yellow for that?

The answer I gave to the OP was based on the LOTG. :cool:
You're right at the highest level. but at amateur Sunday league football, I think it won't be as practical to give a red card for a swear directed at the opponent. During the basic referee course that's what our trainer told us.
 

one

RefChat Addict
Level 7 Referee
I really think context is key.

“Do that again and I’ll knock you out”, I don't see how anyone can come up with conclusion of caution or send off without knowing any context.

If said softly with absolutely no conviction or aggression behind it in a low tensity game it would most likely get a quiet talk on the run from me. With some conviction and aggression then it's likely a yellow for what you would call AAA. In a very tense game causing or in a mass con, said with a lot of conviction as if he is really going to follow through with it, could get a send off. It's a lot less about the actual words here and a lot more about context and how the words are delivered.
 
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