RefSix

Senior AR

QuaverRef

I used to be indecisive but now i'm not so sure
Level 6 Referee
I’ve done a couple of games as a senior AR for the first time this season so managing the benches has been a new one on me. Because of no comma, one thing I’ve found difficult is dealing with coaches complaining about decisions, and I’ve found myself repeating the same things such as ‘the referee is in a better position, I’ll ask him at HT and let you know after’, ‘speak to the referee after the games’ and ‘I’m 40 yards away, I can’t tell you what they’ve seen’.

any tips on how you deal with this type of thing?
 

wazztie16

Level 7 Referee
Level 7 Referee
Keep telling them you can't give a credible decision from your distance, that the ref likely had a better angle, and when they carry on moaning, consider speaking to the ref (even if just to make the ref aware), or become selectively deaf.

It can be difficult being dugout side.
 

Kes

I'll Decide ...
Level 5 Referee
It doesn't really matter what you try and placate them with - ultimately you're just as bad as the referee by default. The more you try and explain stuff or even defend the referee's decisions (right or wrong) the more they'll gob off and distract you.

I'll often engage in a bit of witty banter or humour with the benches when the moment allows but I simply just keep my back to them and "zone out" when the moaning/questioning starts. Easier said than done sometimes I know, but once you hear the time-honoured phrase "Come on lino - you've got to help him out there!!" ( :rolleyes: ) you'll know it's time to just press the "ignore button" and focus on what's on field. ;) :meh:
 

Russell Jones

RefChat Addict
Level 3 Referee
Because of no comma, one thing I’ve found difficult is dealing with coaches complaining about decisions.

any tips on how you deal with this type of thing?
Sadly, punctuation is in a terrible state in the modern game 😂

More seriously, don't try and defend the indefensible, the whole team just loses credibility. Try and build rapport pre game and be clear about your expectations. And remind them that (hopefully) the match referee is much closer to most incidents than they are!
 

socal lurker

RefChat Addict
I like to use "we" when talking about distance and angle--"He's 40 yards closer than we are, and he had a good angle on that play." It's a subtle reminder to the coach that he doesn't have a good view either, not just that I don't.

Sometimes, "I was watching for OS, coach, I didn't have a good view" can also help, especially if it is that coach's defense, where he wants the AR paying attention to OS.

But like dealing with players and coaches in the middle, it becomes a matter of feel and experience in how you can manage coaches.
 

RustyRef

Administrator
Staff member
Try to build up rapport with them before anything even vaguely controversial happens. If it is a minor decision that it looks like the referee has got wrong, such as a throw-in or a free kick in a non-dangerous area, when they complain you could say something like "yes, from this angle it looked wrong but the referee has a different angle". But never do this on a goal, disallowed goal, or anything that could lead to a goal like a penalty or free kick in an attacking area as that won't end well.

The other option is to claim an Arsene Wenger, and say you were looking at the defensive line and therefore didn't see it, this is especially useful when it happens in the other half to you.
 

PinnerPaul

RefChat Addict
Level 7 Referee
Try to build up rapport with them before anything even vaguely controversial happens. If it is a minor decision that it looks like the referee has got wrong, such as a throw-in or a free kick in a non-dangerous area, when they complain you could say something like "yes, from this angle it looked wrong but the referee has a different angle". But never do this on a goal, disallowed goal, or anything that could lead to a goal like a penalty or free kick in an attacking area as that won't end well.

The other option is to claim an Arsene Wenger, and say you were looking at the defensive line and therefore didn't see it, this is especially useful when it happens in the other half to you.
as I said yesterday, I DID say that once and the coach was very irate that I wasn't 'even looking at that half' ie the half that has nothing to do with me really!
 

Eddie

Well-Known Member
Level 7 Referee
You’re never going to win- by engaging with them.

You back the refs decision and ‘you’re just saying that’, you don’t, by sitting on the fence and you’re ‘bottling it’. You throw the ref under the bus completely and you can guarantee that’ll be the next thing they start shouting at the ref the next time he’s in earshot.

Answering for every call just means you’re going to be pelted with questions all game too.

I’ve given a quick: ‘it’s the refs game so it’s his call’. Always happy to explain my calls if it’s convenient. Explaining someone else’s when you’re trying to concentrate on play is a non-starter to me.

I always wonder how fourth officials do it!
 

RefIADad

Well-Known Member
Level 7 Referee
Try to build up rapport with them before anything even vaguely controversial happens. If it is a minor decision that it looks like the referee has got wrong, such as a throw-in or a free kick in a non-dangerous area, when they complain you could say something like "yes, from this angle it looked wrong but the referee has a different angle". But never do this on a goal, disallowed goal, or anything that could lead to a goal like a penalty or free kick in an attacking area as that won't end well.

The other option is to claim an Arsene Wenger, and say you were looking at the defensive line and therefore didn't see it, this is especially useful when it happens in the other half to you.

I use this both as a fourth official and as a trailing AR. My standard operating procedure as a trail AR is to watch behind the referee's back unless the ball is on my touchline. When I'm a fourth, I'll usually watch the part of the field that normally doesn't have eyes on it with three neutral officials.

When a coach wants to argue with me about a call, I'll provide something like "I understand what you're seeing from where we are standing. However, the center has a different angle." Occasionally, I'll bring out the "I'm watching what's happening off the ball" line to a) let the coach know I'm scanning the field and not focused on what the rest of the crew is watching and b) to buy myself a little bit of space. If the coach comes back with something like "well, why aren't you watching the game?", my response is, "I am - just a different part of the game." Sometimes that works, sometimes that doesn't.
 

santa sangria

RefChat Addict
I’ve done a couple of games as a senior AR for the first time this season so managing the benches has been a new one on me. Because of no comma, one thing I’ve found difficult is dealing with coaches complaining about decisions, and I’ve found myself repeating the same things such as ‘the referee is in a better position, I’ll ask him at HT and let you know after’, ‘speak to the referee after the games’ and ‘I’m 40 yards away, I can’t tell you what they’ve seen’.

any tips on how you deal with this type of thing?
Yes, very good.
Also you can choose a point to be proactive - check that they understand why AR2 delayed a flag, or if they saw an advantage, shows you are human and "in the game".

Mix it up. If you keep saying "sometimes we see different things" they will starting taking the p**s.

The hardest for me is using comms when the bench and I have clearly seen a small foul on the ref's diagonal, and the ref has a great view and wants play to continue. I don't try to make something up, just be straight but DON'T BREAK THE TEAM: "sorry guys, I can't interfere there, the ref's made a strong decision, he's seen everything..."

Also share the love between benches. If I have had to talk to the near bench a lot for some reason, I will find an excuse - when the ball is being fished out for a far side opposite end corner - to go and say something to the far bench - even it is "I was just explaining the advantage, you got that"... my logic is that it is important to be fair and not appear to be coaching one bench.

Just don't let it become an argument, don't get distracted while the ball is in play. Smile sometimes. Laugh off the ridiculous appeals. Short stern words when appropriate.

(This has just been the season of bench management for me, so I have a horse in this;))

For anyone else reading. Remember, as a great mentor said: "DON'T BREAK THE TEAM". If you undermine your ref, you have failed, no matter if they are falling apart in the middle. Your job as AR is to help your ref keep match control.
 

Ben448844

RefChat Addict
Level 6 Referee
Depends on the nature of the questioning. If its just constant moaning then it's repetition of "hes got the best view from the middle" until they give up expecting a different response. Good natured questioning or out of character frustration (maybe if the ref has made a big error for example) then ill have more of a chat. Theres one coach I've been AR1 3 times for that always moans at the ref and then comes straight for me as a tactic. I'm just not interested in engaging more than necessary because he's looking for me to contradict the ref so he can shout "even the lino thinks your your wrong". Its about reading the room.

Academy match 2 weeks ago and the ref (consistently excellent in my experience and someone who's traits i have learnt alot from) gave a foul when the attacker slipped with no contact. Ref didn't have a great view and just gave it for safe refereeing purposes I think. Manager came and had a laugh with me, and the atmosphere was such that I could say "I agree, but its the first thing I've ever seen him get wrong". Again its about reading the room. Im not going to stand there and say hes got a better view from the middle as its just one of those incidents where the ref has made an obvious error, but the atmosphere from the coach allowed me to agree that hes got one wrong without effecting the team.
 

Arbiter

Member
Level 3 Referee
I’ve done a couple of games as a senior AR for the first time this season so managing the benches has been a new one on me. Because of no comma, one thing I’ve found difficult is dealing with coaches complaining about decisions, and I’ve found myself repeating the same things such as ‘the referee is in a better position, I’ll ask him at HT and let you know after’, ‘speak to the referee after the games’ and ‘I’m 40 yards away, I can’t tell you what they’ve seen’.

any tips on how you deal with this type of thing?

I would not advise telling the coach to speak to the referee after the game. Remember, it is a sending off offense for coaches to enter the FOP to remonstrate with the referee, even at half time and full time. Otherwise, you're saying the right things. Be honest, be polite, be firm.
 

Jevon Swinscoe

New Member
Level 7 Referee
As stated previously it depends on how good a relationship you have with the benches. I had one game this season that I was senior for and it was 2 teams that know each other very well.

During this there was a couple of questions but I know that answering will calm them down. They accepted my explanation and this lead to a great game with no agro. We even have a laugh when he made a comment with my response of 'not today thanks I will keep it in my shorts'.

Sometimes thought this may not work. But stoll remain calm and always be honest with them, you might not become their best friend but they will respect you more than others.
 
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