RefSix

Explaining to players

echo24uk

New Member
Level 5 Referee
#1
I personally will try to explain a decision if required in order to placate the player/s involved

Whilst of course not explaining every decision I find that sometimes a simple 'I didn't see it so I can't give it' or 'from my angle' etc

I find a lot of players accept this and respect you more for it.

One game this season I awarded a free kick just outside the box, I set the wall up and then took a position to monitor the offside. As the player took his run up I look along the line , the ball rebounded off the wall And out for a corner! I then had the attacking players screaming at me for handball.

I promptly said to the captain that I had looked for the offside and not seen what it had hit in the wall he calmed down his players.

After the game the defending player it had it shook my hand and said it did hit my arm ref as I jumped I had it up,
On going to collect my flag from the attacking team the players again questioned I simply said, 'I am sorry if I got it wrong however I didn't see it so therefore couldn't give it' a comment of 'well thanks for explaining and being honest about it makes a nice change '

I also take from this the learning point of my positioning to allow a better view of both.
 

SteveAustinRef

Well-Known Member
Level 7 Referee
#2
I think being open and honest with players, managers etc... helps. They remember we are human and can make errors once you say your sorry and hold your hands up. I only think its right that if you drop a bollock you should admit you made a mistake. As you say everytime I have done it the players are happy and leave it at that.
 
#3
I think honesty is the best policy but a lot of teams will come back and bite you in the arse and kick off with you over stuff like that especially if it didn't go there way.
 

ref craig

RefChat Addict
#8
can I ask a question then does dissent sometimes come under this as on 2 occasions this season ive had players question this decision and ill give the example

can I ask you a question ref why did you give that free kick ref. ive cautioned for both times so if possible any help thanx craig
 
#9
I always say to the teams, pre-match, that I will explain any decision if I am asked in an appropriate manner and at an appropriate time.

If they come up and say that craig, then I will probably answer them. If they start to whinge about the explanation then I would consider booking.

Couple of times yesterday it happened, from a goal kick, the ball was dropping and a defender positioned himself underneath it. He's done a 'standing jump' to head the ball, as a striker has taken a few steps forward and challenged in the air nudging the defender in the back. Defender did head the ball, but the nudge meant he lost control of where the ball went, it skimmed off his head and fell to the attacking team.

Offending attacker asked 'Why ref? We both jumped for it" My reply, "His was a vertical jump whereas you came in with momentum and didn't get the ball." "Oh, ok then,"

This was in the center circle, and I suspect it may have gone differently if it was on the edge of the box but it kept things at the right tone and the game went without too much incident.
 

jojo

Assistant World Cup Sweepstake Organiser
Level 7 Referee
#11
A lot of the time, I explain my decision without anyone confronting me. Today, I gave a free kick, and the player looked at me as if to say what for? I didn't do anything? So I explained why I gave the free kick, and he just went o'right, and walked away. A lot of the time, I just say a few words for it, e.g. "just tripped him up there boys", and things like that, even though nobody asks or anything like that, but players do listen to me - its not like I'm talking to myself!
 

Mick.

RefChat Addict
#12
Sometimes though players want an explanation when one isn't required. My last game and the ball goes out for a throw. Defender says "how is it their throw?" I replied, "When one of your players touches it last the throw goes to their side. It's not a new law!":rolleyes:
 

PK13

New Member
#13
I agree with jojo and I often just say why I've given without anyone asking and i feel it helps reduce dissent as i get the first word not the players
 
#14
I dont quite understand this post Craig are you saying that you caution a player for asking the question?

can I ask a question then does dissent sometimes come under this as on 2 occasions this season ive had players question this decision and ill give the example

can I ask you a question ref why did you give that free kick ref. ive cautioned for both times so if possible any help thanx craig
 
#15
I have recently bought a DVD called "The Referee's" it follows FIFA ref's at the world cup in 2010, you can hear through the ref's microphones exactley what they say to each other and the players. The way alot of them speak to the players really opened my eyes and changed my reffing style, they are very open, very honest and if they get something wrong apolgise on the pitch there and then. On one occasion the referee actually seeks out the captain of one of the teams to apologise about his decision, its well worth a watch.

As alot of you have said though it is down to your style and man management as and when to use this as some players/clubs just cannot be managed in this way.
 

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Ryan Owens

Token Colonial
Level 3 Referee
#16
The difference is, Oliver, that those referees already have the players' trust and respect. They have the personal capital, so to speak, to be able to apologize for a mistake and get away with it but we don't necessarily have that. "Sorry I made an error" quickly leads to "This ref keeps screwin' up!"
 

Mick.

RefChat Addict
#17
"Sorry I made an error" quickly leads to "This ref keeps screwin' up!"
That was me last night. Foul given to orange. One player throws the ball across to the player who is going to take the kick. While the ball is still rolling, he takes a quick free kick to a team mate. White defender shouts "Hold on ref" and I initially think that he is complaining about the quick one. As the orange player takes a shot at goal, I realise that I made a mistake in allowing the quick one as the ball wasn't stationary. I blow just as the goalie saves it. "Sorry boys, I made a mistake. The ball wasn't stationary." I then take the ball back for the free kick to be taken properly. Cue goal keeper ripping into me about allowing the free kick again. "Sorry fella, I made a mistake." This isn't enough for him and he keeps going. I blow my whistle and call him over for a public word regarding his dissent. I understand that he is upset but the restart was wrong and it should be done properly. After the quiet word he walks off and decides to have another pop. Out comes the yellow and a word with him in the presence of his captain as he still cant seem to keep his mouth shut. Had I got it right the first time, white goalie wouldn't have got a card. But I do wish they would remember that we make mistakes too. If I ripped into them everytime they made a mistake I would never keep my mouth shut.
 

Ryan Owens

Token Colonial
Level 3 Referee
#18
Well that's not entirely true. He'd have ripped into you either way because he felt hard done by because he made the save but the other team get another crack at a free kick. To me, it's as simple as saying "The ball was never in play because it was never restarted properly." I don't mind you saying sorry, I should've stopped it earlier in this case because it makes it obvious to everyone you recognize that it's somewhat inconvenient but it is what it is. I don't think that you ended up cautioning the GK because you apologized, I think you had to caution the GK because he's an ass.

I guess what I was getting at with 'sorry' leading to 'stuff your sorry' is when you apologize two or three times in a match. Understandably, players will stop taking you seriously. Confidence when you know you may have screwed up is an important part of the job.
 

Mick.

RefChat Addict
#19
Fair point Ryan. In fairness the orange coach did say to me afterwards "Its nice to have a ref who is happy to admit he has made a mistake". Mind you, his team won 10-0 so he was in a good mood anyway.
 

Ryan Owens

Token Colonial
Level 3 Referee
#20
Yeah, I'm not trying to say don't admit a mistake just don't do it a) during the match unless its something trivial (e.g.: pointed the wrong direction for a throw in) and b) don't expect everyone to just say "oh, alright then, no trouble". If you apologize, expect someone to say something along the lines of "Aren't you paid not to make those mistakes?" Some people assume that they get Prem quality refs even though they play **** quality football.
 
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