RefSix

Second half and remembering teams have swapped ends

#1
It doesn’t happen in every game, but there are some games where in the second half, I have a bit of a mental block that the teams have switched ends! Twice yesterday I had to take a few seconds before signalling to really think about which way the team was attacking in the second half. It’s never an issue during attacking play, but more play in the middle of the park at throw ins or free kicks.

Not sure if this is unique to me? But anyone have any half time routines or second half tips to ensure they remember the teams have changed ends?
 

RustyRef

Administrator
Staff member
#3
You could verbalise the decision loudly initially “yellow throw” “Blue FK” then all the players know your decision while giving yourself a couple of seconds to untwist your brain and signal correctly
This. I used to get affected by this so would just shout blue throw, red throw, etc, wait to see who picked it up and then signal.
 

Ganajin

Active Member
#4
This may sound ridiculous but I use silly childish word associations to help remember which team kicks which way. For example if there is a club house behind the white team's goal, I think "defending the White House". If there is a road at one end, and a team in yellow attacking that goal, I think "going down the Yellow Brick road". At half time, I think of a new set of associations. Sounds ludicrous but it works really well.
 

Big Cat

RefChat Addict
#5
This may sound ridiculous but I use silly childish word associations to help remember which team kicks which way. For example if there is a club house behind the white team's goal, I think "defending the White House". If there is a road at one end, and a team in yellow attacking that goal, I think "going down the Yellow Brick road". At half time, I think of a new set of associations. Sounds ludicrous but it works really well.
To repeat my theory on the subject. It happens because we're neutral and don't care which direction the teams are kicking in. Your solution works until half-time, after which you'll have to reverse the phraseology. I rely on self-commentary on the game; as if i was a fan or did care
Running the line is more difficult because there's offside to equate for. Also the ref may be relying on you to take the lead WRT ball in/out of play
 

Justylove

RefChat Addict
#6
I did it this past weekend. On the line in a supply league game and signalled a corner instead of a goal kick. Attacking team took the corner quickly whilst I was still looking confused, fortunately it came to nothing!

Quite simply I just have to ratchet up the concentration levels for the first 5 or so in the second half to ensure it doesn't happen
 
#7
Glad to hear I'm not the only one who suffers from this :)

I like the idea of calling first, ie blue throw etc, giving myself a few extra seconds before signalling. I also ended up using the verbal methodology as well at the weekend. There were trees behind one goal only and so I kept saying "Red's defending trees" in the second half and that helped. So that's great suggestion.

I guess it is just also ratcheting up the concentration levels. I actually don't purposely think that the teams have no changed ends at half time or even at the start of the half. I just assume it will not be an issue, since it never was when playing. So even maybe just having a good think about it at half time could help.
 
#8
It’s not an issue when playing because you care about going in one direction. Totally different as a ref.

For lower levels where GKs are likely to play other positions too (and therefore are wearing the same socks as the rest of the team), an easy cheat sometimes is to glance back at the keeper’s socks.
 

one

RefChat Addict
#9
For the first 5-10 minutes of the second half, l keep reminding myself of which team is running which way. Best opportunities are at goal kicks, corner kicks and when defenders have the ball with no press on.
 

Ganajin

Active Member
#10
I also think corners are a danger. The ball swings in and you see a penalty box full of players, and suddenly you can forget who is attacking and who defending. In one early game I saw red clearly foul blue. I blew the whistle, pointed to a spot ten yards from goal, and said confidently "Free kick to blue" The players all stood looking at me. "Do you mean a penalty ref?" asked one. "er yes...that's right....a penalty". And everyone knew what I had done. Now I always look at the corner taker and say to myself "Blue attacking" (or whatever). Again, very obvious, but it works.
 
Top